Rob Killen's picture
By Rob Killen, Professional Development Editor

Hiring quality employees can often be a difficult task. Hiring quality employees that will stay with your company for an extended period of time can prove to be even harder. On the internet many agencies report an average annual employee turnover rate of around 20%. These statistics are confirmed by several sources, such as the U.S. Department of Labor. The 20% figure is even higher in some industries such as retail, and industries that have a younger work force. Younger workers will often take positions on a part-time basis while attending school, and also fill many of the entry level positions upon completing their field of study, only to move on once they gain some work experience. However by investing a little time and effort, you can ensure your organization gets the right person for the right job.

The expense and time associated with hiring new personnel make it essential to hire the right person the first time out. Failing to hire the right person for the job means that you and your organization will have to re-invest in marketing, advertising, job training and more. By following a few key strategies, you can ensure that your church or organization minimizes the risk of failing to hire the best person for the position. The strategies outlined here should also be used for churches and nonprofit organizations seeking to hire unpaid volunteers.
 

THE RIGHT ATTITUDE IS IMPORTANT

Ensuring that a prospective employee has the right attitude is critical to the success of each and every hire. Many organizations often place an emphasis on education and experience. While both of these attributes are important, the right attitude can often be the deciding factor in determining the ultimate success of your new hire. Is your new prospective employee positive, upbeat, and willing to learn? Do they engage well with other members of your team? Do they have good communication skills, and work well with others, or do they prefer to be assigned projects that allow them to work alone? These are just a few of the areas that you need to uncover with any potential new employee.
 

HAVE A COMPREHENSIVE JOB SCREENING AND INTERVIEW PROCESS

You should always take your time and do your due diligence before bringing on a new employee. Never hire an employee after the initial interview. Instead, make sure you have multiple interview sessions spread out over a period of time. This provides both your church, or organization and the potential hire the time to learn more about each other and make sure the job is the right fit for both sides.

Be sure to have the candidate interview with at least two different people from your church or organization. For example, let’s say that you’re looking to hire a new personal trainer for your fitness ministry. The first interview may take place with someone from your administrative staff at your church. If things go well, the candidate would then schedule a second interview with the fitness director, or personal training director. During this second interview, they could also spend some time meeting with other personal trainers, staff and members from your church fitness ministry. This allows them to meet some of the people with whom they will be working while also providing an opportunity to see how they interact with staff and members.

The feedback given from the staff and members are important, as the candidate will be spending a significant amount of their time with their fellow employees and members of your fitness ministry. If all goes well, the third and final interview would be conducted with your Recreation Director, or Associate Pastor. Three interviews, scheduled over three different days, with three different people. This format allows both you and the candidate to make sure that the job is a good match for each of you.

TAKE A SINCERE INTEREST AND LEARN ABOUT THE CANDIDATE

Job satisfaction and a sense of being appreciated are two of the most important areas for most potential employees. They want to feel appreciated for their time and effort, and they want to look forward to coming to work each day. Take the initiative to learn about each prospective candidate. What kind of person are they? What are some of their hobbies and interests? Taking a sincere interest in a potential candidate communicates that you care about him or her as an individual. Learning more about your potential employee and his or her background can go a long way in determining if you’re both a good match for each other. You may also uncover some other strength or experience that the candidate may have that could benefit your church or organization. For example, maybe you’re hiring for a personal trainer position, however the candidate also has a strong background in graphic design and could also devote a few hours a month to your church and fitness ministry newsletter. You’ll never know unless you probe and ask the questions.
 

ASK FOR REFERENCES

You know doubt want every solid potential candidate to have a successful track record and background. Many employers will request at least three references but up to five can be even better. Feedback from previous employers can go a long way in determining what type of attitude, work ethic and team player this individual really is. Why did the candidate leave the previous job, how long was the employment and how well did the employee relate with both customers and other co-workers are all important areas to discuss with past employers. Be aware that some organizations only provide limited information, like the last dates of employment and the titles of positions the person held.

Although it will take some time, if you and your staff put forth the necessary effort, you can ensure you give your organization the best chance of hiring the right person for the job the first time out. This can save you a great deal of time and money down the road, while ensuring you hire people who best fit with your team.

 

Rob Killen is a 20-year veteran in the health and fitness industry. Rob received his Bachelor’s Degree in Education from Wayland Baptist University in Texas, and his Master’s Degree in Public Administration and Nonprofit Management from George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. Rob regularly consults with health clubs, and has a passion for helping churches looking to develop fitness ministries. For any assistance in planning or growing your church fitness ministry, Rob can be reached directly through churchfitness.com .

 

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About the Author

 
  • Rob Killen's picture
    Rob Killen is the Church Fitness Department Editor for Faith & Fitness Magazine, and a 27 year fitness industry veteran. Rob received his Bachelor’s Degree in Education from Wayland Baptist University, and his Master’s Degree in Public Administration and Nonprofit Management from George Mason University. Rob regularly consults with health clubs, and has a passion for helping churches looking to develop fitness ministries. For any assistance in planning or growing your church fitness ministry, Rob can be reached directly through ChurchFitness.com .

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